PEOPLE AND PUGET SOUND

 

People and Puget Sound are inseparably linked—we depend on and directly affect our region’s ecosystems, of which we are a part. The health of our communities, economies, and physical, psychological, social, and cultural systems are directly linked to our environment. The way in which we manage and make decisions about the environment and our structures and processes of governance also affect human wellbeing. For these reasons, human wellbeing—both our health and quality of life—is also important to the health of Puget Sound.

Each Vital Sign has measures to track progress toward goals, objectives, and recovery targets. The Human Wellbeing Vital Sign indicators track and reflect important aspects of human wellbeing related to the environment in Puget Sound. They highlight the connections between human and natural systems and the condition of the Puget Sound ecosystem. These indicators include familiar aspects of human health, like clean air, water, and food, as well as other aspects of quality of life such as economic vitality, cultural wellbeing, and sense of place. Read more about human wellbeing and how it is being addressed within Puget Sound recovery.

To address the many challenges facing Puget Sound, comprehensive strategies for recovery—called Implementation Strategies—are being developed for some of the Puget Sound Vital Signs. Most of the environmental challenges of Puget Sound involve people and the decisions they make. Actions intended to benefit people in the short-term can have unintended long-term consequences. Because human and natural systems are inextricably linked, efforts to recover Puget Sound must consider the underlying social and ecological systems. Read about the stewardship and outreach efforts of our partners and the Partnership

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